Friday, 29 March 2013

Using Git Branches to fix Issues added to TeamMentor's GitHub repository

This is the currently workflow that I’m following when coding/fixing TeamMentor Issues added to the TeamMentor/Master/Issues list.
  • Find issue to address
  • Create and checkout new branch (with the issue ID on its title)
  • Apply the fixes (on the new branch)
  • Commit the changes (on the new branch)
  • Checkout master branch
  • Merge changes (from new branch) into master , using the --no--ff (no fast-forward) option (this is very important, see here and here for a good explanation why)
  • Push to GitHub
Lets look at this in action.

Here is a simple issue to fix: https://github.com/TeamMentor/Master/issues/389

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In GitHub, the issue is #389 , so on a local clone of the Master repository, we create a branch called Issue_389 (using the –b switch to create it)

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In VisualStudio, apply the fix to the code:

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Quickly look in a browser to confirm the change (this should also be reconfirmed via a UI UnitTest):

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Commit the change to the Issue_389 branch:

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Which means that at this moment, there is nothing else to commit on the Issue_389 branch:

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which is now one commit ahead of master

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Next step is to checkout (into) master and do the git merge using the --no--ff

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Gitk shows the effect of the --no--ff (ie. the use of the branch was preserved)

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Final step is to push the commits to GitHub:

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Here is the commit at GitHub:

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Here is the GitHub's Network view:

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